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The big picture in safety: security experts at Chulalongkorn University
column
11 Feb 2020
Surachat Bamrungsuk
Surachat Bamrungsuk
Facebook Twitter by The Nation
The Korat artillery incident is an important lesson in security, while the government needs concrete measures to deal with this situation, a Chulalongkorn security expert, Surachat Bamrungbamrungbamrung University, told ISI news agency.

The above information gives us opinions, critics and others. Thai people have never experienced this kind of event before. But now, this crime has become the fiercest in the world. And experts in criminology expect that it does not stop easily here, but still, advance continue another case in future. Especially it will grow up as much as talking in social.among all of us.

Many thanks to Google Translate and G Grammarly.

  

FRANCE 24 English – LIVE – International Breaking News & Top stories - 24/7 stream

https://youtu.be/NbKzACYrWZQ

Watch ABC News live https://youtu.be/sx4e405BJxs

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UN Aims to End Female Genital Mutilation by 2030

February 10, 2020

FILE - A woman wears a jersey reading
FILE - A woman wears a jersey reading "No to female genital mutilation" during a demonstration in Marseille, southern France, March 8, 2018.
 
UN Aims to End Female Genital Mutilation by 2030
 
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United Nations agencies warn that the widespread custom of female genital mutilation comes at a big cost, both in human and economic terms. U.N. officials are calling for an end to the practice by 2030.

Also known at FGM, female genital mutilation is the act of cutting and/or removing part or all of a female’s external genitalia. It can also include other injuries to the female genitals.

FGM is mostly carried out on girls, from when they are very young to the age of 15.

The World Health Organization, WHO, says around 200 million girls and women alive today are suffering the physical and psychological effects of FGM. Most live in one of 30 countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia where FGM is often performed.

Within West Africa, FGM is extremely common in some countries. In Guinea, it is done to 97 percent of females. Gambia, Burkina Faso, Mali and Sierra Leone all have rates above 75 percent. It is extremely uncommon in Niger; there, it is done on only 2 percent of females.

A woman holds a card in her lap about the problems with female genital mutilation (FGM) during a session to educate women in Minia, Egypt June 13, 2006.
A woman holds a card in her lap about the problems with female genital mutilation (FGM) during a session to educate women in Minia, Egypt June 13, 2006.

FGM has no medical benefits, only damaging results. That is what Monica Ferro told VOA. Ferro is the director of the U.N. Population Fund’s office in Geneva, Switzerland. She told VOA that women and girls who have undergone the practice suffer long-term physical and psychological harm.

"It often leads to bleeding, to infections, to infertility” and other problems that last a lifetime. These can include urine infections, problems while giving birth, and “sometimes it even leads to death,” Ferro said.

Even with these risks, the practice has continued largely in the name of culture and tradition. Some communities believe FGM helps prevent sex before marriage. They also believe it helps make sure a woman will not cheat on her husband because it reduces her desire for sex.

In addition to the physical and emotional price paid by the girls and women, there is also an economic cost.

A new report by WHO estimates that medical care necessitated by FGM costs about $1.4 billion a year. For some countries, the costs are nearly 10 percent of total health care spending every year. In a few nations, WHO officials say, the number is as high as 30 percent.

Ferro said an estimated 61 million girls will be cut between now and 2030 in countries where FGM is widespread. But she noted progress in the areas and countries where U.N. agencies are working to end the practice.

Ferro added that the countries with the highest amount of FGM are also countries with high population growth. So, while the actual number of girls at risk is higher than before, the rate is improving.

People working to end the practice say that support for FGM is shrinking. In countries where FGM is widespread, girls between the ages of 15 and 19 are less supportive of the practice than women aged 45 to 49. They say that young people can play an important role in halting the custom.

Prisca Korein, a 62-year-old traditional surgeon, holds razor blades before carrying out female genital mutilation on teenage girls from the Sebei tribe in Bukwa district, December 15, 2008.
Prisca Korein, a 62-year-old traditional surgeon, holds razor blades before carrying out female genital mutilation on teenage girls from the Sebei tribe in Bukwa district, December 15, 2008.

Many places have passed laws against the practice—including 26 countries in Africa and the Middle East. Enforcing the laws can be difficult, however, and the result may be that the practice is now done in secret.

"For the last 20 years, we have a law against the practice in this country," said Amadou Moreau, founder of Global Research and Advocacy Group. The a Senegal-based nonprofit works to end FGM. Moreau added, "It's the most controversial law in this country. Because, when you're dealing with people's faith and beliefs and culture and tradition, executive order has no place to guide people on how they should behave, how they should act."

Experts say the most effective solutions are using both grassroots efforts and policy change. They say that a powerful way to bring about change is to show people that others have stopped the practice and have seen improvements in the well-being among their girls.

I’m Anne Ball.

And I'm Brian Lynn.

Lisa Schlein and Annika Hammerschlag wrote stories on this topic for VOA. Anne Ball adapted their stories with additional information from the WHO. The editor was George Grow.

Is FGM practiced in your country? What do you think of this story? Write to us in the comments section below.

 

UN Aims to End Female Genital Mutilation by 2030

UN Aims to End Female Genital Mutilation by 2030

Start the Quiz to find out

_______________________________________________

Words in This Story

genital mutilation – n. the action of cutting or damaging genitals, or sex organs

practice – n. something that is done often or regularly

external – adj. belonging to or forming the outer surface of something

psychological – adj. affecting the mind; emotional or mental

benefit – n. a gain or profit

urine – n. waste liquid that collects in the bladder before leaving the body

grassroots – n. the ordinary people in a society or organization : the people who do not have a lot of money and power

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February 11, 2020
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February 11, 2020

February 11, 2020
A look at the best news photos from around the world.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas holds up a document as he speaks during a Security Council meeting at United Nations headquarters.
1Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas holds up a document as he speaks during a Security Council meeting at United Nations headquarters.
Kenyan military members carry the container holding the body of former president Daniel arap Moi,  at his state funeral in Nyayo Stadium, in Nairobi.
2Kenyan military members carry the container holding the body of former president Daniel arap Moi,  at his state funeral in Nyayo Stadium, in Nairobi.
Anti-government protesters throw rocks at police during a protest against a parliament session in downtown Beirut, Lebanon.
3Anti-government protesters throw rocks at police during a protest against a parliament session in downtown Beirut, Lebanon.
A Syrian government helicopter is shot by a missile in Idlib province.
4A Syrian government helicopter is shot by a missile in Idlib province.
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders takes the stage with Democratic Representative Alexandria Ocasio Cortez at a campaign event at the University of New Hampshire, one day before the state's primary election, Feb. 10, 2020.
5Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders takes the stage with Democratic Representative Alexandria Ocasio Cortez at a campaign event at the University of New Hampshire, one day before the state's primary election, Feb. 10, 2020.
U.S. President Donald Trump is greeted by White House Senior Advisor and daughter Ivanka Trump at a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 10, 2020.
6U.S. President Donald Trump is greeted by White House Senior Advisor and daughter Ivanka Trump at a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 10, 2020.
People wearing face masks are seen on the trading floor at a flower-selling event following an outbreak of the new coronavirus in the country, in Kunming, Yunnan province, China, Feb. 10, 2020.
7People wearing face masks are seen on the trading floor at a flower-selling event following an outbreak of the new coronavirus in the country, in Kunming, Yunnan province, China, Feb. 10, 2020.
This picture provided by the Lebanese Parliament press office shows MP Salim Saade arriving to attend a parliamentary session after being attacked by protesters, in Beirut.
8This picture provided by the Lebanese Parliament press office shows MP Salim Saade arriving to attend a parliamentary session after being attacked by protesters, in Beirut.
Spanish surfer Axier Muniain rides a wave during the Nazare Tow Surfing Challenge in Nazare, Portugal.
9Spanish surfer Axier Muniain rides a wave during the Nazare Tow Surfing Challenge in Nazare, Portugal.
A dog competes at the 2020 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York, Feb. 10, 2020.
10A dog competes at the 2020 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York, Feb. 10, 2020.
Maasai women dressed in traditional clothing attend a memorial service for former Kenya's President Daniel arap Moi at the Nyayo Stadium in Nairobi.
11Maasai women dressed in traditional clothing attend a memorial service for former Kenya's President Daniel arap Moi at the Nyayo Stadium in Nairobi.
A man rides on an ox cart during a competition at Nay Young Pya Inn Pagoda, in Naypyitaw, Myanmar.
12A man rides on an ox cart during a competition at Nay Young Pya Inn Pagoda, in Naypyitaw, Myanmar.
Fruit and vegetables that are no longer fresh cover the CEAGESP complex that was flooded by heavy rains in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
13Fruit and vegetables that are no longer fresh cover the CEAGESP complex that was flooded by heavy rains in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Two chinstrap penguins swim near Two Hummock Island, Antarctica.
14Two chinstrap penguins swim near Two Hummock Island, A
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6 Minute English

INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

What do you buy when you're sad?

EPISODE 171207 / 07 DEC 2017

Have you ever had a bad day and tried to make yourself feel better by going shopping? New research suggests people are more likely to buy things they don't really need when they are sad, bored or stressed. And they'll probably also come to regret their shopping trip.

Dan turns up in the studio with a load of shopping bags and a very strange outfit he bought to cheer himself up. You'll also learn some vocabulary related to shopping and mood.

This week's question:

Online shoppers in which country spend more per household than consumers in any other country, according to a report from the UK Cards Association?

a) The USA

b) Norway

c) The UK

Listen to the programme to find out the answer.

Vocabulary

retail therapy
going shopping to make yourself feel better

down in the dumps
unhappy

pang
sharp pain

buyer's remorse
bad feeling when a person realises they don't need or want the thing you've bought

cozy
warm comfortable and relaxed feeling

does the trick
achieves the result you wanted

Transcript

Note: This is not a word for word transcript

Neil
Hello and welcome to Six Minute English. I'm Neil and joining me today is Dan – who is weighed down with shopping bags and wearing something very… strange. What's going on, Dan?

Dan
Hi everyone. Well, I was feeling a bit miserable so I decided to cheer myself up by going shopping!

Neil
Well that's lucky because the link between shopping and mood is what we're looking at in this 6 Minute English – and of course we'll be giving you six mood and shopping-related vocabulary items. But first, our quiz:

Online shoppers in which country spend more per household than consumers in any other country, according to a report from the UK Cards Association?

a) The USA

b) Norway

c) The UK

Dan
Norway seems to come top of lots of lists, so for that reason alone I'm going to say Norway.

Neil
We'll find out at the end of the show. Now, Dan, you said just now that you went shopping because you were feeling down.

Dan
That's right – I like a bit of retail therapy.

Neil
Retail therapy is a humorous expression which means going shopping to make yourself feel better.

Dan
Oh I do that all the time.

Neil
Yes, I can see. And you're not alone. According to some research done by the website moneysupermarket.com, people are more likely to buy things they'll later regret when they're feeling sad, bored or stressed.

Dan
Well I was feeling a bit down in the dumps. And that's a way of saying 'sad'.

Neil
Oh dear, Dan. Sorry to hear you've been down in the dumps. I only hope you don't also get a pang of regret about your purchases when you get them home – the research suggests that you will.

Dan
pang is a sharp pain. We often hear it used figuratively to talk about strong emotions like guilt, regret and remorse. You're making me feel worse, Neil

Neil
Sorry Dan – it's all for educational purposes! Our audience will learn from your pain! Remorse is like regret – and there's a good expression to describe exactly that bad feeling you get when you realise you don't really need or want the thing you've bought. Buyer's remorse.

Dan
OK, OK, OK enough about me. Let's hear from Sam, Phil and Catherine from the Learning English team to see if their mood affects the shopping choices they make. Listen carefully. Can you hear the three types of things they say that they buy when they're down in the dumps?

Insert
Sam
Honestly, I tend to buy food. Anything that will bring me comfort, so it can be any sort of warm drink, hot drink but also anything kind of warm and cosy – so like a nice jumper.

Phil
Definitely, if I've had a bad day at work, or for whatever reason or I feel terrible, tired, I am more likely to buy something on the way home.

Catherine
Oh when I'm feeling sad, I probably buy a little bit of wine and often something to wear. I find that a bit of retail therapy when I'm sad usually does the trick at the time, so it makes me feel better. But I do find that when I look in my wardrobe, the things that I bought when I was sad – I never wear them.

Neil
Sam, Phil and Catherine there from the BBC Learning English team talking about what kind of things they buy when they're feeling down. What were they?

Dan
Food, drink and clothes.

Neil
That's right. Sam mentioned she buys food, warm drinks and a nice jumper to keep her cosy. That's the feeling of being warm, comfortable and relaxed.

Dan
Catherine also mentioned drinks – this time wine. And she also said that buying clothes does the trick. That means achieves the result she intended. She feels down, she buys clothes, she feels better – it does the trick.

Neil
But what's interesting is that Catherine said she never wears the clothes she buys when she's feeling sad. That's exactly what the survey found – people regret the purchases they make when they're sad, bored or stressed.

Dan
Sounds like a case of buyer's remorse.

Neil
Indeed. Well, time now for the answer to our quiz question. I asked this: Online shoppers in which country spend more per household than consumers in any other country, according to a report from the UK Cards Association? Is it:

a) The USA
b) Norway
c) The UK

Dan
I said b) Norway.

Neil
And I'm afraid you might need to go and buy some more stuff to cheer you up – you're wrong! The correct answer is the UK. Apparently UK households spent the equivalent of $5,900 (£4,611) using payment cards online in 2015. 

Dan
Well, I hope they were happy when they made those purchases or they may feel the pang of regret I'm scared I might get after today's discussion!

Neil
Well, a good recap of the vocabulary from this programme might do the trick.

Dan
Shall we start with the first word? Do you ever go in for a bit of retail therapy, Neil?

Neil
Actually I try to avoid it. Especially after reading this survey – I don't think the happiness you feel after buying something lasts very long. In fact, you can end up feeling down in the dumps.

Dan
Down in the dumps - meaning sad/unhappy. Yes and a pang of regret might follow once you realise you've spent a lot of money on something you don't really need.

Neil
pang is a stab – used here figuratively to mean a sharp pain used to talk about strong emotions. And after the pang can come buyer's remorse.

Dan
Hmm, I'm beginning to feel buyer's remorse from this leopard skin onesie. Seemed like such a good idea at the time.

Neil
Well it does look cozy – warm comfortable and relaxed, so I think if that's what you wanted, it does the trick.

Dan
Does the trick, meaning achieves the result you wanted.

Neil
OK before Dan heads off to buy even more stuff he doesn't need, please remember to check out our Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube pages.

Dan/Neil
Bye!

.........................................................

Their Majesties offer condolences over Korat carnage, grant royal patronage for funerals

Feb 11. 2020

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By THE NATION

On Monday (February 10), Prime Minister and Minister of Defence General Prayut Chan-o-cha made a statement via the Television Pool of Thailand as follows:

 

His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn and Her Majesty Queen Suthida have expressed condolences over the tragedy that happened on Saturday, February 8, 2020, in Nakhon Ratchasima province, and would like to give moral support to families of victims and all related officials. The King has also ordered that the funeral of all the deceased will be under his royal patronage, including Buddhist prayers chanted at the funeral and royal cremation ceremony as special occasions. Furthermore, the King has ordered privy councilors and senior officials from the Bureau of the Royal Household and Royal Security Command to act on his behalf in visiting the injured persons and the families of victims. He has also ordered the establishment of a royal kitchen to provide food and support to officials who are working in forensics and cleaning the venue until the operation is complete.

Lastly, the King has suggested that the government provide assistance to the affected people and officials in any way that it can as soon as possible.

.............................................................

 

Mass shooting a big lesson in security: Chulalongkorn security expert

Feb 11. 2020
Surachart Bamrungsuk
Surachart Bamrungsuk

Facebook Twitter

By The Nation

The Korat mass shooting incident is a big lesson in security, while the government needs to come up with concrete measures to deal with such a situation, Chulalongkorn University security expert Surachart Bamrungsuk told Isara News Agency.

Surachart said the nature of the incident is no different from mass shootings that occur frequently in the United States, but the Thai government has no concrete measures to deal with such an incident.

Thai police officers are trained to deal with basic crime, while soldiers are trained for large-scale battles or traditional warfare, he said. Therefore, when encountering this kind of event, they are not ready to cope with it even after the bomb incident at Ratchaprasong Intersection in 2015.

He looked back on the incident amid the deep South insurgency in 2004, in which terrorists robbed 413 guns from a military camp, while the shooter at Korat’s Terminal 21 carnage was a soldier himself who robbed guns from his peers.

During this time, the government has to show more responsibility than just giving compensation and sending representatives to attend the funerals of victims, Surachart said.

“The event also reflects the relationship between commanders and subordinates, which is causing stress in camps,” he said, while explaining that the military system was supposed to be reformed.

“The Defence Ministry and the Royal Thai Army should have rules prohibiting commanders from seeking benefits from their subordinates,” he said, suggesting there should be a committee to investigate what happens inside military camps as the suspect, a soldier, was reportedly involved in the brokerage business with his commander and they had a conflict.

Surachart felt a gun-control law should be introduced in the country. 

Moreover, he said, people must be trained to prepare for such situations, while the Army should monitor the behaviour of its soldiers to prevent another mass shooting, as the start of a new public security measure.

Surachart said the image of the nation’s leader was another important step that needed improvement because the incident was very sensitive.

Photos of Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha waving his hands as if he was in a concert might be interpreted as apathy, this compares to New Zealand’s prime minister expressing her condolences after the Christchurch mosque shootings, Surachart added.

 

..................................................................

FINISHED

February 12, 2020

 

 


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